Author Life,  Short Stories,  Where It All Went Wrong

Where It All Went Wrong | 8

The bright screen strained her vision in the dark. Lucy had to keep rubbing her eyes just to get them to focus. Simply turning on the lights or opening the blinds would help solve this problem, but she was too invested to care.

Judas Hunt had interestingly enough been a scientist and the old building was his lab. From what Lucy could gather, he was mocked as a mad scientist, accused of conducting crude experiments on anything from rats to people, and that was why the building sat abandoned for so long.

It was quite disgusting, but despite the many claims, it didn’t seem to be proven. Lucy had gone through every inch of the building, aside from the hidden room, and hadn’t noticed any sort of scientific remnants. She remained slightly optimistic, even if it was just to save her from buyer’s remorse.

She kept scrolling through the articles. Most had said the same thing, but she kind of wanted to find a picture. There was something about learning someone’s story and not knowing their face.

Finally, towards the bottom of the page, she found a picture thumbnail and clicked on it. It was a photo of the owner and his brother, Griffith Hunt, and a man who looked strikingly familiar.

“Dad?” Her whisper hung in the air as she zoomed through the article attached, looking for the name of the third man.

“During this time Judas Hunt had developed partnerships, most prominently with his older brother, Griffith Hunt,” she mumbled, “but the one that surprised the town most was young entrepreneur, David Lexington.”

Lucy bit her lip. Her dad had never mentioned anything about working with a scientist. He was a business consultant. She scrolled down the bottom, needing more information, and saw a list of related articles.

The one that caught her eye was an obituary. Judas and Griffith Hunt died in a car crash, leaving behind only a young baby girl, Griffith’s daughter. Lucy’s dad was listed in the obituary as a surviving member with the daughter.

Lucy snapped her computer shut. She knew she was adopted, but she never asked about her parents. She should have.

A knock on the door caused her to jump. After a deep breath, she walked to the door. Standing on her toes, she peered through the peephole.

It was Sullivan.

“Go away!” she yelled through the door. It was met with an even harsher knock. She yanked it open, ready to yell, but Sullivan pushed his way through, closing and locking the door behind him.

“We have to go.” He went from window to window, not even looking at her.

Lucy threw her hands down and looked up to the ceiling, sick and tired of this. “I’m not going with you.”

Sullivan turned on his heel. “What did you find in the building today?” He stared her down, right in the eyes.

She gulped. He really wasn’t someone she wanted to confide in, but he was quite intimidating. It didn’t help he towered over her.

He didn’t wait long for an answer. “Look, whatever it was, WDS know about it, so we have to go.”

Lucy scoffed. “How do you know that?”

“They’re outside.”

She rolled her eyes at his dramatics and walked to the living room window. Peering through the shades, she didn’t see a thing in the dimming light. Then she saw a bright blue light.

“Okay,” she said backing away from the window, “they might be out there.”

Sullivan shook his head. “We’re leaving.” He threw a pair of sneakers at Lucy and went to stand by the door.

Fueled only by the shivers the blue light sent down her spine, she quickly laced up her shoes. As an after thought, she rushed for a small backpack and shoved her laptop, charger, and paperwork in. Maybe they had answers about her real father. She looked at Sullivan and nodded.

Away they went.


Posting this much faster than originally planned, but that’s good! Thanks for reading!

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